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Mother’s Day is celebrated around the world in a way in which reflects each nation’s customs and traditions, however as we all know some things in life translate the same through every language. The Language of Love!

In Australia on the 2nd Sunday in May, many Australian families gather together to celebrate with love and joy their mothers, grandmothers, great grandmothers, aunts, and other special women and mother’s in their lives. Mother’s Day often begins with the lovely treat of breakfast in bed and is followed throughout the day with Mum being pampered with special gifts, flowers and cards made by children in the family.

In France, Mother’s Day or Fête des Mères is celebrated on the last Sunday in May (unless Pentecost falls on the same day, then it is celebrated on the first Sunday in June).  It is a day to make Mum (Maman) the centre of attention. On this special Spring day, family’s often come together and celebrate with a special meal, flowers and cards. Children will often practice a poem to surprise their mother with, and at the conclusion of a special meal Mother’s are often presented with a beautiful cake that often resembles a bouquet of flowers.

History of Mother's Day in France

In 1806, French Emperor Napoleon Bonapart, established a special day dedicated to the mothers of large families.

After WWI, in the city of Lyon (1918), this celebration was revived to honour the widows who lost their husbands and sons during the war.  This day was officially recognised by the French government in 1929.

In 1941, the Vichy Regime chose the last Sunday of May as the official Mother’s Day date. In 1950,  a law was passed as follows:

“Every year, the French Republic pays an official tribute to Mothers during a special day dedicated to the celebration of Mother’s Day”.
A SPECIAL MOTHER'S DAY {Fête des Mères} QUOTE TO SHARE

The heart of a mother is a deep abyss at the bottom of which you will always find forgiveness.

Le coeur d'une mère est un abîme au fond duquel se trouve toujours le pardon.

Honoré de Balzac (19th century French Novelist)


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